PRUNING, SPRAYING, HARVESTING

Pruning
Pruning

The day has gone, probably forever, when setting out fruit trees and giving them occasional cultivation, "plowing up the orchard" once in several years, would produce fruit. Apples and pears and peaches have occupied no preferred position against the general invasion of the realm of horticulture by insect and fungous enemies. The fruits have, indeed, suffered more than most plants.

PLANTING: CULTIVATION: FILLER CROPS

Best trees
Best trees

As the pedigree and the quality of the stock you plant will have a great deal to do with the success or failure of your adventure in orcharding, even on a very small scale, it is important to get the best trees you can, anywhere, at any price. But do not jump to the conclusion that the most costly trees will be the best. From reliable nurserymen, selling direct by mail, you can get good trees at very reasonable prices.

HARVESTING AND STORING

Harvesting
Harvesting

For storing small quantities of the roots, such as carrots or beets, they are usually packed in boxes or barrels and covered in with clean sand. Where an upstairs room has to be used, swamp or sphagnum moss may replace the sand. It makes an ideal packing medium, as it is much lighter and cleaner than the sand. In many localities it may be hard for the gathering; in others one may get it from a florist.

THE VARIETIES OF POME AND STONE FRUITS

Fruit
Fruit

Many a home gardener who has
succeeded well with vegetables is,
for some reason or other, still
fearsome about trying his hand at
growing his own fruit. This is all a
mistake; the initial expense is very
slight and the same amount of care
that is demanded by vegetables, if
given to fruit, will produce apples,
peaches, pears and berries far
superior to any that can be bought,
especially in flavor.

INSECTS AND DISEASES AND METHODS OF FIGHTING THEM

Insects
Insects

I use the term "methods of fighting"
rather than the more usual one,
"remedies," because by both
experience and study I am more and
more convinced that so long as the
gardener--home or otherwise--who
cares to be neglectful and thus
become a breeder of all sorts of
plant pests, is allowed to do so--just
so long we can achieve no remedy
worth the name.

BEST VARIETIES OF THE GARDEN VEGETABLES

Garden vegetables
Garden vegetables

It is my purpose in this chapter to assist the gardener of limited
experience to select varieties sure to give satisfaction.
To the man or woman planning a garden for the first time there is no
one thing more confusing than the selection of the best varieties. This
in spite of the fact that catalogs should be, and might be, a great
help instead of almost an actual hindrance.

THE VEGETABLES AND THEIR SPECIAL NEEDS

Vegetables
Vegetables

The garden vegetables may be
considered in three groups, in
each of which the various
varieties are given somewhat
similar treatment: the root crops,
such as beets and carrots; the
leaf crops, such as cabbage
and lettuce; the fruit crops, such
as melons and tomatoes.

ROOT CROPS

THE CULTIVATION OF VEGETABLES

Cultivation
Cultivation
Before taking up the garden
vegetables individually, I shall
outline the general practice of
cultivation, which applies to all.
The purposes of cultivation are
three--to get rid of weeds, and
to stimulate growth by (1) letting
air into the soil and freeing
unavailable plant food, and (2)
by conserving moisture.
As to weeds, the gardener of any experience need not be told the
importance of keeping his crops clean.

SOWING AND PLANTING

Planting
Planting




SOWING AND PLANTING

The importance of having good seeds
has already been declared. They
must not only grow, but grow into
what we have bought them for--be
true to name. Without the latter
quality we cannot be sure of good
gardens, and without the former they
will not be full ones. A meager "stand"
from seeds properly sown is a rather
exasperating and discouraging
experience to encounter.

STARTING THE PLANTS

Plants
Starting the plants
This beautifully prepared garden
spot--or rather the plant food in
it-- is to be transformed into good
things for your table, through the
ever wonderful agency of plant
growth. The thread of life inherent
in the tiniest seed, in the smallest
plant, is the magic wand that may
transmute the soil's dull metal into
the gold of flower and fruit.